Monthly Archives: October 2015

Cockle picking on the tidal flats

Wednesday 28th October.  Day 3: Rob Witbaard and Chris Richardson led the group in some practical fieldwork investigating variability of shellfish distribution.  We took advantage of some decent weather to step out of the classroom to a nearby tidal flat where we collected cockles along three 300 metre transects then took them back to the lab to measure them and assess the length frequency distribution along the transects.

Cockle Group 2

Ready for action!

 

Chris and quadrat

Chris shows Irene and Ariadna how to randomly position a quadrat then hold it in position in the mud

 

Sieving cockles

Sarah and Juliane sieve some chunks of mud …

 

Cockles out of the ooze

… and slowly the cockles emerge out of the primeval slime

 

A luverly bag of cockles

“I’ve got a luverly bag of cockles”
Tamara (with fork), Rob (with quadrat), Stella (with scarf and wellies) and Chris (proudly displaying his cockles) after a good days work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cockle density plot

We even got some results. Density increased strongly towards low water, but there was a sudden cutoff at the edge of the intertidal zone, perhaps because the sediment became more sandy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cooked cockles

But in the end you just have to cook your fieldwork ….

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cockles on table

… and eat it !

 

 

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the Texel workshop

Posted by Paul

De Slufter, incoming saltwater through the dunes.

De Slufter, incoming saltwater through the dunes. Photo by Hans J.S.C. Jongstra

The next ARAMACC training event isn’t just a workshop.  It isn’t even a double workshop.  This time we are offering us a TRIPLE workshop featuring “Ecology of long-lived bivalves”, “Attracting funding” and “Introduction to R”.  With Rob Witbaard leading, this will take place at the world-famous Netherlands Institute of Sea Research (NIOZ) on the breezy and bracing North Sea resort island of Texel.  With this workshop happening in the last week of October, it could well be exceptionally breezy!

The workshop takes us from the welcome dinner on Sunday 25th through to Friday 30th October – or the following Monday for those who are braving the optional “R” workshop: the full schedule is here.

The workshops will feature some exciting and distinguished guests:

40f31b1eea426b60618702ea81201331Dr Bryan Black from University of Texas at Austin, dendrochronologist, sclerochronologist and proven expert in the integration of ecological variables to build multicentennial climate reconstructions.  Bryan will be introducing us to the use of multivariate analysis in ecology and leading an exercise in the application of multivariate methods to existing datasets.

 

 

DavidReynolds

Dr David Reynolds from the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences at Cardiff, who is currently aiming to publish the first 1,000-year annually resolved marine temperature record and who has just obtained funding from NERC for a pan-Atlantic sclerochronology project (CLAM – Climate of the LAst Millennium).  David will be contributing to the grant capture workshop.

 

img_2647-lavaleyeDr Marc Lavaleye, a specialist in the ecology of cold water coral reefs, will give the keynote talk at the start of the workshop on Monday.

 

 

 

 

In addition some of the ARAMACC regulars will be offering their expertise, with Julian introducing us to taxonomy and bivalve identification (useful as I suspect some of us can only identify about two species), while Chris, Paul and Rob will describe their experiences obtaining – or more often failiong to obtain – grant funding.  We’ll also – I hope (weather permitting) – get out of the classroom, when Rob takes us to sample Cerastoderma on the tidal flat.

NIOZ luchtoverzicht 1

NIOZ and the Texel ferry port